Positive Values and Peer Groups

Share

Having positive peer groups are important! Lately, I’ve been listening to a new Podcast, Inside the Champions Mind, on my way to work in the mornings. In a recent episode, they discussed developing values and having positive peer groups. Below are some thoughts…

Developing your values has a major impact on your life. If we think about values mainly as what things are important to us and what we sacrifice to still accomplish these, what are they for you? What do you truly value? They suggest using Dr. John Demartini’s Value Determination Workbook to discover your true values. Your values tie directly to what company you should keep. Namely, who is frequently around you? Who influences your decisions and what you do on a regular basis? This is one area that is often overlooked, yet controls much of what we accomplish and who we become.

Don’t think so? Take a moment and think about what your closest friends are like. Are you in a good position right now with your life? Do you have a successful career? Personal life? These are questions you should constantly ask yourself. If the answer was ‘no’ to any of those, take a second to assess who you spend most of your time with and how they act. Do they inspire you, or detract you from achieving your goals?

Choosing to be around positive people will most certainly help you become more successful than your current state. Not only are these people positive and determined in their own lives, but they will be willing to help you succeed as well. They will want to use their skills, knowledge, and contacts to help you on your journey. So, be aware of who your friends are and if their goals are similar to your own.

Next post in this series, I will discuss the ins and outs of what it means to really use your peers’ help and how to make better contacts for future growth.

____________________________________________________________________________

The ideas, comments and materials presented herein are solely those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the NSCA’s official position on an issue. The NSCA assumes no responsibility for any statements made by authors, whether as fact, opinion or otherwise.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *